Last edited by Vudogis
Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of ground water resources of Westchester County, New York found in the catalog.

ground water resources of Westchester County, New York

E. S. Asselstine

ground water resources of Westchester County, New York

by E. S. Asselstine

  • 307 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published in Albany .
Written in English

    Places:
  • New York (State),
  • Westchester County.
    • Subjects:
    • Groundwater -- New York (State) -- Westchester County.,
    • Water-supply -- New York (State) -- Westchester County.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby E. S. Asselstine and I. G. Grossman. Prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the New York Water Power and Control Commission.
      ContributionsGrossman, Irving Gross, 1917- joint author., Geological Survey (U.S.)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsGB1025.N7 A3 no. 35, etc.
      The Physical Object
      Pagination pts.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL211678M
      LC Control Numbera 56009652
      OCLC/WorldCa3981662

      Year Published: Methylmercury—total mercury ratios in predator and primary consumer insects from Adirondack streams (New York, USA) Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that affects biota in otherwise pristine settings due to atmospheric transport and deposition, and conversion, via natural processes, of inorganic mercury to methylmercury (MeHg), the bioavailable and toxic form. National Ground Water Association. National Rural Water Association. New York Rural Water Association. New York Section AWWA. New York State Society of Professional Engineers. New York Water Environmental Association. Water Environment Federation. Westchester/Putnam Chapter of the New York state Society of Professional Engineers.

      The Croton Aqueduct or Old Croton Aqueduct was a large and complex water distribution system constructed for New York City between and The great aqueducts, which were among the first in the United States, carried water by gravity 41 miles (66 km) from the Croton River in Westchester County to reservoirs in was built because local water resources had become polluted Architect: John B. Jervis; David Douglass; . BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DETAILED AQUIFER MAPPING PROGRAM In the U.S. Geological Survey began a Detailed Aquifer Mapping Program in upstate New York, in cooperation with the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), funded by the USEPA's Underground Injection Control Program. The objective of this program was to define the hydrogeology of 21 extensively used .

      Sarah J. Meyland, J.D., is a water specialist with a background in groundwater protection, water resources management, and environmental law. She is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Technology and Sustainability, NYIT College of Engineering and Computing Sciences. In all, the New York City Water Supply System provides nearly half the population of New York State with high-quality drinking water. WHERE DOES NEW YORK CITY’S DRINKING WATER COME FROM? New York City gets its drinking water from 19 reservoirs and three controlled lakes spread across a nearly 2,square-mile watershed.


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Ground water resources of Westchester County, New York by E. S. Asselstine Download PDF EPUB FB2

With: The ground-water resources of Greene County, New York / Berdan, Jean Milton. Albany, Bound together subsequent to publicationPages: The ground water resources of Westchester County, New York by E. Asselstine, edition, in English. The ground-water resources of Westchester County, New York, part 1, records of wells and test holes Item Preview.

Water use, ground-water recharge and availability, and quality of water in the Greenwich area, Fairfield County, Connecticut and Westchester County, New York, [John R. Mullaney] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Buy The ground water resources of Westchester County, New York, (New York) by E. S Asselstine (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : E. S Asselstine. water resources, ranging from salt marshes, estuaries, and coastal beaches or ground water, to the lowest point where it collects in a stream, pond or wetland.

From there it may continue to fl ow on to another waterbody. Westchester County, New York City, and the Bronx River Alliance are three groups working to protect the Bronx River.

Asselstine and I. Grossman, “The Ground-Water Resources of Westchester County, New York, part 1, Records of Wells and Test Holes,” New York State Water Power and Control Commission Bulletin, GW, Soil and Water Conservation District. Established in under New York state law by the then County Board of Supervisors, the Westchester County Soil and Water Conservation District is charged with developing and carrying out soil, water and related natural resources conservation, management and educational activities.

Groundwater is a critical source of water in New York State. Learn about groundwater including basic information, Primary and Principal Aquifers, groundwater resource mapping and quality monitoring, Long Island aquifers, the Divison of Water recommended pump test procedures, water supply well decommissioning recommendations, and the water well driller program.

Although many high yield bedrock formations exist in upstate New York, "the most productive aquifers consist of unconsolidated deposits of sand and gravel that occupy major river and stream valleys or lake plains and terraces.

Ground water in these aquifers occurs under water-table (unconfined) or. Updated May - List of New York State Certified Laboratories registered with the Westchester County Department of Health to submit all required water test results and other required information.

(pursuant to the Private Well Water Testing Law, Chapter of the Laws of Westchester County). Resources. Private Drinking Water Well (EPA). Notice - The USGS Water Resources Mission Area's priority is to maintain the safety and well-being of our communities, including providing critical situational awareness in times of flooding in all 50 U.S.

states and additional territories. Our hydrologic monitoring stations continue to send data in near real-time to NWISWeb, and we are continuing critical water monitoring activities to.

Computation of bedrock-aquifer recharge in northern Westchester County, New York, and chemical quality of water from selected bedrock wells (Water-resources investigations report) [Stephen W Wolcott] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. County Stormwater Program Westchester County is also a regulated entity under the Phase II program.

For information on the county stormwater program, annual reports, and other information, contact David Kvinge, Director of Environmental Planning by phone at () or by e-mail at.

Stormwater Education and Outreach Program. Drinking water quality is ensured through expanded monitoring and sampling of county water supplies.

Environmental engineers regularly monitor water and sewage treatment plants to improve and maintain healthful and safe drinking and bathing water quality and to prevent and control water pollution. Asselstine, E.S. and Grossman, I.G. The ground-water resources of Westchester County, New York, part 1, records of wells and test holes: New York State Water Power and Control Commission Bulletin GW, 79 p.

"LIZARDTECH". Sources of Ground Water in Southeastern New York By Nathaniel M. Perlmutter INTRODUCTION ground-water resources of New York con­ and Control Commission. Reports on the in­ vestigations in Putnam County (Grossman, ) and in Westchester County (Asselstine and Grossman, ) have been published.

AtAuthor: Nathaniel M. Perlmutter. Water Use, Ground-Water Recharge and Availability, and Quality of Water in the Greenwich Area, Fairfield County, Connecticut and Westchester County, New York, – In cooperation with the town of Greenwich, Connecticut Water-Resources Investigations Report U.S.

Department of the Interior U.S. Geological SurveyCited by: 4. Summary Reports Cosner, O.J.,Atlas of four selected aquifers in New York: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Report, Contract No.

Task No. 17, p. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. Hydrogeology of the Croton-Ossining area, Westchester County, New York in SearchWorks catalog.Water use, ground-water recharge and availability, and quality of water in the Greenwich area, Fairfield County, Connecticut and Westchester County, New York - Seasonal variability and effects of stormflow on concentrations of pesticides and their degradates in Kisco River and Middle Branch Croton River surface water, Croton Reservoir System.An empirical technique was used to calculate the recharge to bedrock aquifers in northern Westchester County.

This method requires delineation of ground-water divides within the aquifer area and values for (1) the extent of till and exposed bedrock within the aquifer area, and (2) mean annual runoff.